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Nora Dooley -

Tomorrow morning we will ask a group of about sixty Congolese men what they are going to do for the women and girls in their communities

nora dooley

 

Tomorrow morning we will ask a group of about sixty Congolese men what they are going to do for the women and girls in their communities. What would you like me to tell them on behalf of you, the mothers of Kalebuka??
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It was Thursday afternoon and I was sitting in a circle with my teammates and twenty women, all mothers of children who play at Malaika?s FIFA Football for Hope Center near Lubumbashi, DRC. We had just finished the fourth day On-Field with a fantastic bunch of participants. The group was comprised mostly of returning coaches from the two previous years of CAC trainings, the vast majority being older men with clear experience in both playing and coaching football.

Now, to massively understate, I?ve led a few CAC programs where I am in the minority as a woman. I find confidence here ? almost as if the strength of all the incredible females I?ve ever met or known is fueling me in this seemingly boundless male-dominated territory. But looking around the circle at these mothers? I?ve never felt so small. I let go of all personal doubts as to what I was doing there and dove in. I had to hear them ? and not just because I was selfishly eager to know even a small part of their stories, but because all week long conversations about gender equity and women?s rights were sprouting up from men. It was past time for the woman?s voice to Mingle Mingle.

We laughed, we listened, we danced. And I carefully noted.

The intense week with the coaches charged my emotions in this session. In four days we had explored ideas about different cultural possibilities, different organized religious beliefs (or lack thereof), and new and different ways to venture into these types of vital discussions on the football pitch. The participants were given the opportunity to identify a specific social issue and adapt or invent a game that would create space to discuss solutions. We danced through the struggles and vulnerabilities of coaching for social impact that ? in my opinion ? inevitably produce more beautiful music. One of the key conversations was unpacking the coaching toolbox that the participants could make use of if they so chose. A particular tool that came up repeatedly on and off the field was the use of a coach?s ears. And how as leaders we have the option to lecture or listen. The movement from the former to the latter over the course of the coaches? practical sessions was profound. Our model, demonstrated not forced: their choice.

They chose and chose and chose.? And we listened. After two years of Child Protection Policy trainings (bearing in mind the bulk of returning participants) and the outspoken passion these men demonstrated as they brought up gender inequalities as problems, it was time to shake things up for some localized policy design.

The final day began with small group discussions:

Imagine a future where women and men are treated equally: what does that look like for you?

What is preventing this future from being reality?

What must we do to achieve this future? What would you include in a policy/action plan for gender equity ? for the rights of women and girls in your communities?

They vehemently engaged, discussed, shared, listed, debated, agreed to disagree on some things, unanimously agreed on others. They had big ideas and some steps in mind to realize them. But there was still an essential missing piece. I told them about our meeting the previous afternoon with the mothers. I told them we had something to add on behalf of those women. I asked the men if they wanted to listen.

They chose, once again, to use those brilliant ears and I was given a most humbling and thrilling honor of channeling the voices of these Kalebuka mothers, echoing thousands (millions?), as I read aloud their call for parity.

?We women have all the same rights as you.?

?Come with us, men and women together, into the community to share knowledge about girls? and women?s rights.?

?Let us play! You need to create space and opportunities for us and our daughters to play. If you get two days on the field? we get two days!?

?Encourage us, and include us!?

?We are strong, too.?

And if I may be so bold to add? We are women, and we ASK for Choice!!!

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Nora DooleyFCN Ambassador:?Nora Dooley is a coach with a very interesting coaching lifestyle! ?She is the??Self-Directed Learning Coach and ASK for Choice Strategist? for Coaches Across Continents; a charity that focuses on?local issues such as: female empowerment, including gender equity; conflict prevention,??and is the Global leader in social impact change. ?Nora travels the world to places such as Haiti, Cambodia and Israel to train and work with underprivileged communities.

CAC_Visual ID_FinalCoaches Across Continents; a charity that focuses on?local issues such as: female empowerment, including gender equity; conflict prevention,??and is the Global leader in social impact change. ? ?ASK for Choice?is a female?empowerment programme created by Coaches for Continents and?will enhance personal and community responsibility and produce locally owned and relevant gender equity initiatives. Women?s and girls? rights are violated daily. Cultural norms and traditional stereotypes restrict their choices. Violence and harmful practices against them continue despite international treaties and protective legal documents. Where laws exist, they are frequently not enforced or brought to life. Global conflict is exacerbating the situation as refugee women and girls are particularly vulnerable to violence, exploitation and denial of their human rights.

 

Through ?ASK for Choice?,?Coaches Across Continents?will create an environment for the progression of?Attitudes towards girls? education and gender roles; the development of?Skills for female leadership and problem solving; and the increase in?Knowledge of gender policies. This will lead to girls? and women?s rights, educational, employment, entrepreneurial, financial, and health choices.

 

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