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British Football supporting 22 Malaysian women football coaches (Malaysia)

The Premier Skills initiative, run by the English Premier League and the British Council, recently conducted a community coaching course with 22 aspiring women community coaches.

The course was held on October 15-18 in Bandar Sunway, in partnership with Sunway University and was led by Samuel Siew, supported by Kelvin Chee, Patrick Loo and Dawinder Randhawa, four Level 1 Premier Skills coach educators.

“Premier Skills uses football to develop a brighter future for young people around the world, drawing upon the global appeal of the Premier League and its expertise in delivering community programmes in the UK, alongside the British Council’s global network and track record of delivery,” said Siew, lead coach educator.

Siew added that through Premier Skills, young people, often including the most vulnerable in society, were given opportunities to become better integrated into their local communities, to develop their skills for employability and to raise their self-esteem.

“We recognise that sport makes a powerful contribution to building trust and opportunities, so Premier Skills aims to support the empowerment of women and girls through sport, ultimately strengthening the role of, and creating more opportunity for them in wider society,” Siew said.

“I did not realise there are women out there who also play football and love the sport as much as I do,” said one of the participants, Samantha Tham.

“This course is great and it is such an eye opener. I was also able to connect with other female footballers, and the thinking that football being a man’s game is so not true.”

Graduates of the Premier Skills course at Sunway University took the opportunity to break down gender barriers. – Pic courtesy of Sunway University, November 5, 2015.Graduates of the Premier Skills course at Sunway University took the opportunity to break down gender barriers. – Pic courtesy of Sunway University, November 5, 2015.

Uefa Women’s Development representative and former Switzerland women’s head coach Beatrice Von Siebenthal was also present to observe the course.

“It’s great to see that a programme like this exists. It’s good to see someone is taking care of the well-being and interests of our female footballers and coaching education,” she said.

“This course is just the beginning of what is yet to come for women’s football in Malaysia,” Siew said.

“These new coaches have been equipped with skills to plan and conduct fun learning sessions at a grassroots level. They are also ready to break the mind-set that girls can’t play this sport, and to strive for gender equality in football,” he added.

 


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